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poodiecat

Glasgow Schools

Keep on meaning to take a photo of Bellahouston Academy across the road ....  
poodiecat

Oh sorry, I neglected to say that it would be nice to see photos of schools on here, and I even found one, from the first holga film I ever used ( toy camera )  




Alex Glass

Townhead Primary School





Kent Road School



St Mary's Calton





Gowanbank, Craigbank



Burnbrae, Priesthill



Have lots more just need to locate them and will post them up later.
Alex Glass

Old Levern School previously located on Prestwick Street in Craigbank. A new school was built on Drumbeg Drive but was demolished in 1997/8.



Sir John Maxwell's PS, Pollokshaws.

John

poodiecat wrote:
Oh sorry, I neglected to say that it would be nice to see photos of schools on here, and I even found one, from the first holga film I ever used ( toy camera )  






A Found Face there too poodie
John

Great pics Alex  
poodiecat

Scary wrote:

A Found Face there too poodie


Oh cheers, never noticed it before, and it's even got a trunk  
HollowHorn

Looks like Renfrew Town Hall.
Alex Glass

Some from London Road Primary School during a visit a couple of years ago.











HollowHorn

Martyrs' School, Townhead:








The school was commissioned in 1895. The established local architectural firm Honeyman & Keppie was given the brief of providing a school to house between 900 and 1000 'scholars'.

In the twenty years since the Education Act, a convention had been established for the layout of new Glasgow schools, and Martyrs' was expected to follow it: schools were to be symmetrical, with classrooms surrounding a central communal space and separate entrances and staircases for boys and girls.

The school has three storeys plus a basement. The basement contained a darkroom, workshop, staff changing room, and heating plant with air ducts and a fuel store.

On the ground floor, the drill hall was in the centre, with dressing rooms and four classrooms leading off it. There were five classrooms on both the first and second floors, linked on each floor by a balcony around the space created by the central hall.

In addition, there was a headmasters' study, staff room janitors' room, book storage are and medical room, and cloakrooms on each floor.

The internal walls contained the ventilation and heating ducts. The completed building cost £9,630, which was within the budget of £10,000 allocated for it.

When the school was built, it sat among rows of four-story tenements, which have long since been demolished.
poodiecat

HollowHorn wrote:
Martyrs' School, Townhead:





Thank you so much HH, I had no idea how gorgeous this was inside!
Alex Glass

My old school, Ruchazie Primary.













This is my old class and the photo is taken from where my desk use to be.







HollowHorn

Some of the other guys have better photos of the Martyr's School & yes, it's gorgiss inside.
poodiecat

Alex Glass wrote:
My old school, Ruchazie Primary.





Shame it's so run down, I can see that the design must have been well groovy back then  
John

poodiecat wrote:
Alex Glass wrote:
My old school, Ruchazie Primary.





Shame it's so run down, I can see that the design must have been well groovy back then  


Groovy....You oan the swally poodie ?
Alex Glass

Washington Street School, my father's school



City Public, the school where my older brothers and sisters went.



Milton Street School, my first school



Nitshill Primary School, where my two girls went.

HollowHorn

Alex, the building with the domed roof, is that the one I see from the Canal St. Line? What is it?
Alex Glass

Ruchazie Primary has now been demolished I believe. When it was closed the vandals got in and flooded the whole area.

It was groovy Poodie

HH

If you are talking about Washinton Street School you can see it from the motorway as you leave the city on the M8 heading to Paisley. It is in Washington Street  which is just off Argyle Street at the western end next to the Kingston Bridge.
Alex Glass

Sorry HH I really do need to get new glasses.

I take it you are talking about Nitshill Primary. The doom is not part of the school and is located in the Industrial Estate it is commonly known as the Nitshill Nipple. It is part of the Roads Department Depot and is the store for the winter salt. You can see one in the Gartcraig Depot as well.
poodiecat

Alex Glass wrote:


... commonly known as the Nitshill Nipple


     
HollowHorn

Alex Glass wrote:
it is commonly known as the Nitshill Nipple.

As opposed to the Firhill fanny  

Good to find out what the building is used for, cheers.
Alex Glass

Hope that isn't a slight at Partick Thistle fans there HH

As a lifelong Jags fan I could bet upset.
John

Alex Glass said:
Quote:
I could bet upset.


Nah....I doubt that
HollowHorn

Alex Glass wrote:
As a lifelong Jags fan

Aye, it's an addiction right enuff  
Alex Glass

                                                                         


Wait a minute!

That's not funny

You implying i'm a junky there HH                    

                       
poodiecat

WTF?

Bellahouston Academy tonight ....

Alex Glass

Lovely sign Poodie
Stuball

poodiecat wrote:
WTF?

Bellahouston Academy tonight ....



I noticed some freshly boarded up windows on the other side from this shot
Alex Glass

Lambhill Street School









Stuball

Glasgow School of Art


Alex Glass

Two new schools between Ruchazie ans Craigend



LowLight

Nice shots Alex. I used to play golf (hit some baws aboot) right up and down there.
Alex Glass

It was usually the battle ground for some fighting as well as an amateur golf course before you graduated to Lethamhill
LowLight

Yep I used to watch the fighting from my house in Mossvale Square then graduated to staggering home to the very same place from the Real Mackay in Millerston. :)
poodiecat

Since it's such a hot topic just now, I went on the exhausting journey across the road to take some more snaps while I still can:



John

poodiecat wrote:
Since it's such a hot topic just now, I went on the exhausting journey across the road to take some more snaps while I still can:





Thank technology for the "Zimmer Frame"
poodiecat

       

And one from the front of the main building of the "Old Bellahouston Academy" on Paisley Road West.

Alex Glass

Poodie that photo looks strange

Why is there so much light on the doorway

It looks like there may be spirits at work
poodiecat

It's the ghosts of school days past that protect the building and annex, they shall forever haunt all councillors that approve their demolition or stand in the way of their maintenance.  
Alex Glass



Now that is very scary  
poodiecat

Alex Glass wrote:


Now that is very scary  


Exactly, I hope you'll spread the word  
Alex Glass



Alex Glass

All Saints

All Saints





Alex Glass

Ashpark Primary School, Arden

Ashpark Primary School, Arden

Mahdi West

Former Quarry Brae School, Parkhead
Alex Glass

Nice one Mahdi

What about the new one
cybers

Great photo Mahdi

Any plans yet for the old one ?
Is it going to get a scary visit in the near future or perhaps a wee business centre in the offing ?
Mahdi West

No idea on this school I'm afraid. I was passing by chance and it caught the eye. I confess that the new one didn't have a look-in  
 I remember reading a couple of years ago that it was closing and forgot all about it. I don't know much about it apart from it standing proudly. The jannie's house still stands and there's another building just to the right of where I took the photo but I don't know what that was. Any ideas? Perhaps it was the local nursery laterally?
Solid looking buildings so hopefully some use can be made for them. A good sized playground so plenty of spaces for the BMWs and Audis  
wee minx

It looks very secure too...pity
cybers

Tis indeed the Quarrybrae Nursery Formerly the Annexe
Beano

Haghill school

norrie

Thanks to Alex Glass, Calamity and I got a tour round London rd primary School on the 9th of Decemeber, here are some of the photos that were taken
Not sure when Calamity will post hers


Boys toilets,I wonder if calamity has been in them before ;D



norrie

London rd primary school

Celtic Park from one of the classrooms

norrie

London rd primary school
Dining room and kitchen





norrie

London rd primary school
From Kerrydale st




From Kinloch st


From London rd
norrie

London rd primary school


Stairs at boys side of school



norrie

London rd primary school


Janitors house.
This is a good house going to waste pity someone couldn't get the use of it
I have heard the Celtic Football Club are interested in the school, lets hope if its true, they can retain the school and house and include them in their plans for the area.



Living room?



Kitchen





Front room





I guess this was a girls room




Another room





smallest room in the house



James

Excellent pics Norrie. Some of that decor is honking.



James H
cybers

Cracking pics Norrie....
Agree with James the Decorator must have been Stevie Wonder...
norrie

I didnt want to pass any comment on the decor, in case there was someone who knew the Jannie

Bye for now, norrie
sputnik

cue billy connolly,oh the jannie ,oh the jannie,he nearly drove me madhe shopped me tae the teacher everytime that i was bad,i wish that hed retire or die or move tae garngad,ma hearts pure sore wae the jannie
Mahdi West

Holmlea Primary, Cathcart
Don't know a lot about this one. I think it closed 4 or 5 years ago. I'm surprised it hasn't been converted into housing or whatever given that its just across the road from the station. Still, time will tell.







The jannie's house

Doog Doog

Nice ones,Mahdi.
norrie

Hi mahdi, I was down that way a couple of years ago, I too am surprised its still standing
Bye or now, norrie
Stuball

Was it not closed due to the proximity of the Cart at a flood point? Now that they are building flood protection, perhaps a redeveloper will purchase it.
Mahdi West

That sounds right to me, Stuball. There's plenty of activity along this stretch of the White Cart with virtually all of the trees having been removed.
It's the first time I'd been along there in years but I seem to remember that it was quite thick with vegetation. Now there's a perfect view of the bridge that carries Clarkston Road over the river.
John

Doog Doog

Nice one,Scary.
Doog Doog

ROSSHALL NURSERY







Robert Pool

Temple Primary School



Scotland Street School



Kingsridge School, Drumchapel







Drumry School, Drumchapel



Queen's Park Secondary School



Washington Street School



Dunard Street School, Maryhill



Robert Pool

The old school jotter...memories


[/img]
Stuball

Robert Pool wrote:
The old school jotter...memories




Christ, even I remember them
Robert Pool

I have never seen so many photographs of schools with no children in them. Its a shame that the media has made everyone paranoid of photographing children at play. Being a parent of 3 daughters and 2 grandchildren l fully understand parents concerns regarding childrens safety and protecting them from pedaphiles. I guess it will be the norm in the 22nd century to look back and see no social history photographs of children, researchers will just have to rely on their imagination. If this is the price we have to pay to protect our kids then its a sad world we live in.
cybers

I made a comment very similar to this very sentiment Robert.
Almost all of the photos of kids at play will be from albums created by parents and even then questions get raised why you want to photograph your own children.
McDonalds are the worst offenders using CCTV to capture images of your kids by third party companies in the name of security but wont allow you to photograph your own kids on their premises.
Whilst i fully agree they need protecting to try to dictate if their own parents should photograph them is a step too far.
calamity

Queen Mary St. Primary School Bridgeton.

cybers

The uni's cloisters in an unusual day shot
anne

SCHOOL PICS

I LOVE LOOKING AT THE OLD PICTURES OF GLASGA ,I DIDNT APPRECIATE HOW BEAUTIFUL SOME OF THE OLD BUILDINGS ARE.IVE BEEN IN TORONTO FOR 44YRS ,I DO GET BACK HOME FOR MY GLASGA FIX A LOT
Gallowgategirl

G'Day Glesga Folk, Thankyou for all those wonderful, awful * photis ! It must break your hearts watching those fine buildings rotting away.You wonder who is in control the people or jumped up bureaucrats bumbling along only interested in saving the Masters money and lining their own pockets. How many do you have to a class now?
Having put my tuppenceworth in unfortunately the same things are happening in OZ. Our State ,Victoria , and the local councils are crying poor but what it is the developers are offering them lots of Dosh for the land!!! and building units (flats) .Money,money, money .Anyhoo on a brighter note -- The sun is shining here about 14-15 degrees but it is winter!! Will be in Scotland endish of August and looking forward to it very much . Look after yourselves and Dear auld Glesga Toon.
Regards Linda a Gallowgategirl.      
Lynda Peachey

Townhead Primary School

Alex Glass wrote:
Townhead Primary School

This was my school from 1959 to 65. It's great to see these photos - the  only bits that are left is the surrounding wall around what is now a car park!! Most of the rest of this area is Strathclyde university premises. Thanks for photo Alex.





Kent Road School



St Mary's Calton





Gowanbank, Craigbank



Burnbrae, Priesthill



Have lots more just need to locate them and will post them up later.
Lone Groover

Mahdi West

Former Haghill Primary School






Mahdi West

The Jannie's house for Haghill Primary School


This was the Broompark Day Nursery, which got closed in the latest cuts.


Former Golfhill Primary School


Mahdi West

More of Golfhill Primary School




Former Alexander's Public School on Duke Street. The view of this building standing alone will soon be a thing of the past.
Mahdi West

This was the swimming pool at the old Bellahouston Academy


This was the gym
cybers

Love how all the carwash guys have scarpered yet again ....
Funny how that happens when you point a camera at that structure they all bail into that little door on the right of the shed.
Lone Groover

Not Glasgow- My primary School. West Hill County Primary , Devon. Now two houses !



How many times did we play accross that wall using the skipping ropes as reins for horses ?
Mahdi West

This is what's left of St Gerard's High School in Govan
Beano

The Martyrs Public School



stillucan

Mahdi West wrote:
No idea on this school I'm afraid. I was passing by chance and it caught the eye. I confess that the new one didn't have a look-in  
 I remember reading a couple of years ago that it was closing and forgot all about it. I don't know much about it apart from it standing proudly. The jannie's house still stands and there's another building just to the right of where I took the photo but I don't know what that was. Any ideas? Perhaps it was the local nursery laterally?
Solid looking buildings so hopefully some use can be made for them. A good sized playground so plenty of spaces for the BMWs and Audis  


A year down the road since you posted this Mahdi but I was looking for my old primary school and voila! Thanks. We were bussed all the way from Barlanark to Crail Street, Parkhead 1953-58 and they moan nooadays if they can't park at the school gates! The building you refer to bottom right was horror of horrors where we weans went tae the dentist - and to get all oor jags - a latter day medical centre. I can still hear the screams!  
calamity

Quarrybrae School Parkhead

I see this lovely school torn down and gone.

http://www.parkheadha.org.uk/abou...eration/quarrybrae_primary_school

how it looked yesterday.
617DukeStreet

Photo from July 2000 of 'Denny Private'. In the '60s the kids that came off worst in the 11-plus exam were sent here. It was just around the corner from where I was brought up. Seemed like a rough house. In the end the 11-plus was dumped in 1968 and we were all sent to Whitehill/Onslow Drive.



Cheers

Pete
Hawick_1987

London Road School
mrsgilmour2be

Alex Glass wrote:
Washington Street School, my father's school



City Public, the school where my older brothers and sisters went.



Milton Street School, my first school



Nitshill Primary School, where my two girls went.



Nitshill Primary was the best school when I was a kid! Loved it that much I went back for work experience in 4th year!
Was gutted when it got torn down  
Alex Glass

They plan to build houses on the site and there is a portacabin on site now.

What teachers do you remember from your time at the schoo?

My two daughters went to the school from 1987 till 2006.
mrsgilmour2be

Alex Glass wrote:
They plan to build houses on the site and there is a portacabin on site now.

What teachers do you remember from your time at the schoo?

My two daughters went to the school from 1987 till 2006.


Really?
I haven't been past it in a while.
I remember Miss Knox who turned out to be my wee cousins primary 1 teacher in Cleeves Primary!
Miss Mitchell, Mr Mathers, Miss Sutcliffe, Mrs Leslie, Mrs Grant, Mrs Wright, Mrs Morton and Miss Baxter  
I remember Mrs Blanchflower as well!

I left primary school in 1999    didn't want to though had to go to Hillpark!
Alex Glass

Remember all those teachers too.

My youngest daughter must have been there at the same time as you.

I plan to post up photos of the school site as it is developed. So look out for more photos soon of the site cleared and then the houses built.
Alex Glass

Hyndland Secondary School

For a few months last year I worked on producing some historical information as part of Doors Open Day which lead to me compiling a Centenary  Magazine.

I will post it all up here

CONTENTS

Head Teacher’s Message………………………………..Page 3
Editoral………………………………………………….Page 4
A Short History………………………………………….Page 6
Hyndland at War………………………………………...Page 9
The Great Fire of Hyndland……………………………..Page 11
Teachers Through The Years…………………………....Page 14
Hyndland’s Former Head Teachers……………………..Page 19
Some Former Pupils……………………………………..Page 20
A Norwegian Excursion…………………………………Page 33
Former Pupils Return……………………………………Page 36
Famous Former Pupils…………………………………..Page 38
Hyndland’s Dux Medalists……………………………....Page 40
Alex Glass

Hyndland Secondary School Centenary Magazine

HEAD TEACHER’S MESSAGE

It is a great honour and a privilege to be the Head Teacher of Hyndland Secondary School at any time but particularly so in this the year of its centenary. I am the thirteenth person to have held this post here at Hyndland, according to the noticeboards outside my office! However, there is a list contained within the original School Log Book which provides a more extensive list of previous incumbents.
The past year proved another successful year for pupils and staff at Hyndland Secondary School. The academic achievements by pupils are a testimony to the teaching staff. Everybody at Hyndland works hard throughout the year to maintain the high standards set in previous years.
As we look forward to the next year, our aim will be to maintain these very high standards, ensuring our pupils enjoy their time at Hyndland and play a full and active part to a level that is comfortable to each individual. Hyndland has a long tradition in team and individual sports as well as music, literature and debate. We will continue to offer a wide range of extra-curricular, activity and where possible, expand on the current opportunities.
This year of celebration saw our young musicians perform in two concerts, which were very well attended. The praise they received demonstrated the time and commitment given by students, parents and teachers. We are blessed at Hyndland with a diverse range of staff, willing to put in the extra effort and it would not be fair to praise individuals in such a strong team.
On reviewing past Head Teachers’ messages in previous school magazines, I note with interest the constant reference to change. We are at the threshold of a further period of change. It is more important than ever that we ensure the best education is delivered to all our pupils. Here at Hyndland, we will continue to rise to the challenges that come our way. The future can only be bright if we invest in our young people and make sure that they reach their goals; we are committed to providing the support they require at the time when they need it most.
Our school has set a very high standard. Together with all teachers and support staff, I look forward to playing my part on the road to the next successful 100 years.

Maura McNeil B.Sc


Editorial

Welcome to this the Centenary edition of the Hyndland Secondary School Magazine. In recent years the school had produced a Year Book rather than a magazine but it was agreed that a magazine should be produced to mark the first 100 years of the school at its current location.
It is difficult to judge exactly how many actual magazines have gone before this one so there is no edition number for this magazine. It appears that the first magazine may have appeared in 1932. The magazine for 1959 was shown as Vol. XXVII. and priced at 2/-. For those of you too young to recall that is two shillings in old money and about 10pence in what we refer to as new money. By 1969 the format and design of the magazine was changed. That year’s edition noted as Vol. XXXVII and the priced at 15 new pence.
This magazine will attempt to bring a flavour of what has happened in the school over the last 100 years. It is not a definitive history or a document charting every single year or every activity. It will draw on the available resources to highlight the diverse range of activity through the use of a few old photographs and exerts from previous school magazines.
Hyndland has a long history of extra-curricular activity. There have been a large number of sporting achievements as well as success in debating competitions and great tradition in musical involvement through the School Choir and Orchestra. It won’t be possible to mention every person who participated in any particular way over the last hundred years but hopefully by outlining a few you will get to know a little more about some of the past successes the school and its pupils have enjoyed.
The magazine will have sections for key events and people. Again these are just to highlight some of the things that have happened and the people involved in making Hyndland Secondary School what it is today. It is estimated that over 100,000 pupils and staff have come through the doors at Hyndland. This small magazine is to commemorate every single one of those people and the many and great achievement that have followed over the last 100 years.
Hyndland is one of the most successful schools within Glasgow and it is no surprise that there is always a long queue of people wishing to send their children to the school. Hopefully the next hundred years will be as successful and full of many more memorable events and achievements.
Alex Glass





A SHORT HISTORY
The first School Log Book held in the Mitchell Library the first entry dated May 1st 1912 reads, “Hamilton Crescent Public School was opened today as a centre for Supplementary Classes. 378 boys and 387 girls were present.” There is a side note to this entry made by David Walker M.A on 21st December 1934. It reads, “Whole Staff and pupils moved in April 1912 to the new School at Hyndland (now Hyndland Secondary).
From Sept. 1885 till May 1887 the School was called Partick Academy and met in the building (now the Y.M.C.A. Club) at the top of Peel St. The new building in Hamilton Crescent (now Fortrose St) was opened on 27th May 1887 by Mr A. Craig Sellar, M.P. for the Partick Division of Lanarkshire.”

The first building on site in Hyndland was built in Airlie Street and started off as Hamilton Crescent Secondary but soon became known as Hyndland Public School. The Govan School Board was the education authority in the area at the time as Partick and Govan were to be taken in to the boundary of Glasgow. In a Glasgow Herald report on the opening of Hyndland Public School it is noted that Mr Alex Ure the Lord Advocate opened the school. The school at that time had accommodation for three hundred infants and one thousand, one hundred older scholars and was built in the Renaissance style of red sandstone taken from Locharbriggs Quarry. The building included a large Physics laboratory, a Chemistry laboratory and an Art Room887 by Mr A. Craig Sellar, M.P. for the Partick Division of Lanarkshire.”

The School Board needed a new building as the number of pupils attending Hamilton Crescent Secondary increased. So when the Airlie building was completed in 1912 both Primary and Secondary Departments of Hyndland Higher Grade School, as it was then known, continued to meet here until an extension was built in Lauderdale Gardens in 1930.        



At this time Airlie Street was referred to as the “Old Building” and Lauderdale Gardens as the “New Building”. A further eight hundred pupils could now be accommodated in the school and a new Domestic Science Department was added which included the “house”, which was furnished from floor to ceiling. This was a great attraction for visitors to the school who admired the interior and its lavish furnishings.

At the start of World War 2 the “Old Building” was occupied by the military authorities following the evacuation of the school. There was still a need to accommodate those pupils who had not left Glasgow or had returned. Air raid shelters were built in the playground. The number of pupils allowed to enrol at the school was limited to the number that could be accommodated within the air raid shelters.



On 13th March 1941 the Germans carried out a bombing raid mainly on the Clydebank area. However some bombs were dropped on Hyndland. In the 1962 Jubilee edition of the Hyndland School Magazine, Miss J.M. Anderson recalled, “On the first night we sat at home. I remember, listening hour after hour to the explosion of falling bombs, some distant, some near. After the terror of the night I was astonished at the calm and normal appearance of the scene as I left for school the next morning. But when I passed under the bridge at the foot of the hill at Clarence Drive I felt as though I were indeed a victim of the raid. Right up the street, as far as I could see, not a pane of glass remained, and screen blinds were flapping from many of the empty windows. I moved on and saw that Dudley Drive had received a direct hit, and in the short street people were trying to reach those buried among the stones that had once been homes. In contrast to this activity, groups of men and women stood waiting for news. When I reached school I learned of other direct hits in Peel Street, Kelvindale, Downhill and Scotstoun. But before entering the school building I noticed that the large Victorian villa, which the day before had been a well known landmark at the corner of Turnberry Road and Lauderdale Gardens, had disappeared entirely.
All that remained of that splendidly built house, its occupants and furniture was a blue and white checked tablecloth which hung like a flag from a tree.”

The school inside was a scene of chaos and this resulted in a further evacuation, this time to Cumnock.
After the events of the war everything returned to normal with the usual daily activities of a public school. Many of the school’s sports teams saw success and the other extra-curricular activities were enjoyed by staff and pupils, including trips abroad.
In 1962 the school community celebrated the Jubilee. By all accounts the events organised were enjoyed and provided a time for reflection on both past and possible future events.

Further change took place in 1972 when Hyndland Senior Secondary School was amalgamated with Hamilton Crescent Junior Secondary School to create the new Hyndland comprehensive. Technical Huts were erected in the playground and the Primary Department moved into the vacant Hamilton Crescent building which was located in Fortrose Street. In the 1972 Hyndland School Magazine the Head Teacher, Frank Gillespie commented, “The total of these changes constitutes a very large change indeed. The wind of change in this area has become a small hurricane”.

An unfortunate event occurred on 12th October 1977 when the “Old Building” caught fire. (More details of the fire are provided later.) The building was gutted and at first it appeared that it may have to be demolished. However, a decision was taken by the then Strathclyde Regional Council, Education Committee to restore the building. Work commenced on 2nd April 1979 with the demolition of the internal part of the building to be rebuilt with a new steel framed structure. When work was completed in June 1981 many changes had taken place. The central well was replaced with a sumptuously fitted lecture theatre. The ground floor included the Music and Technical Departments. upstairs housed Business Studies, Modern Languages and the Science Departments.
The building was occupied from Monday 15th June 1981 and formally opened by Councillor Dr Malcolm Green, Vice Chair of the Education Committee and local councillor at a ceremony held on Thursday 12th November 1981.



For the next twenty years the school remained unchanged. By 1987 30% of the pupils attending the school came from outwith the catchment area. Reporting in the Hyndland Secondary School 75th Anniversary School Magazine, the Head Teacher, Gerald J. Coyle, commented on the activities undertaken by the school, “Each year pupils from S1 to S6 undertake a wide range of initiatives to raise money for charitable causes.” He went on to say, “The school is also fortunate to have the support and commitment of those dedicated and hardworking members of the Parents’ Association who, not only raise funds to support musical productions or purchase items not generally funded by the local authority, but take an active interest in the new developments in education, undertake “mock interviews” for senior pupils and provide speakers for careers talks. All these initiatives add to thebreadth and enrichment of the educational experience.”

More trips abroad followed in the years to come as well as other annual trips. Everything at Hyndland seemed to be settled when suddenly the Council announced its intention to tackle the problem of the authorities’ dilapidated Secondary School estate. This resulted in the pupils of Hyndland being temporarily located in Woodside Secondary School for a period of 12 months from 2001 to 2002 whilst extensive renovation work was carried out.
On return pupils and staff found much improved facilities including a new link corridor between the Airlie and Lauderdale buildings.

Alex Glass

HYNDLAND AT WAR

Hyndland was built two years before the outbreak of the Great War/World War I. Unfortunately the memorial board was lost during the last renovation that took place at the school. Lost forever is the list of those commemorated on the memorial. Maybe someone has a photo that can be used to in time to acknowledge their sacrifice before the 100th Anniversary that will take place in 2014.
We can still see the comments of the Head Teacher when the end of the war was announced. These are preserved in the original Log Book of the school which is held in the Mitchell Library. On the 11th November 1918 the Head Teacher, Simon Fraser wrote in the log book;
“School closed this afternoon until Wednesday 13th November in celebration of the signing of the Peace Terms in the Great War, this day the 11th of November 1918.
Before dismissal the pupils assembled in the playground in front of the school. The Headmaster in a few words referred to the great event in the worlds history speaking out that after a struggle which had lasted for 4½ years Britain and the Allies had been victorious and the cause of righteousness had triumphed.
The proceedings closed with the singing of the National Anthem.”

On 1st September 1939 Hyndland Secondary School started the evacuation of the children. It is noted in the School Log Book that the children were taken to Partick Train Station on 2nd September 1939 where railway officials, police, helpers and teachers played a noble part in an operation carried out without a hitch. The next day war was declared against Germany.
Hyndland Secondary School has a Book of Remembrance to our pupils and former pupils of the members of staff who were killed or who died as a result of the 1939-1945 war.



The words to the first page of this book have been carefully chosen. Although there are 110 names (including a late addendum) not all were killed in active service. Four were killed on the night of the Germans bombing of Clydebank. On the evening of the 13th March 1941 German aircrafts where heading to carry out the blitz of Clydebank when suddenly bombs were dropped over Partick. The bombs dropped on Dudley Drive killed 36 people and this included three of those listed in the book of remembrance. The fourth person connected to Hyndland Secondary School who died that night was an Air Raid Warden. A former pupil recalled recently the impact of the blast in Dudley Drive on the school. He remembers clearly that the blast was so strong that all the windows in the Airlie Building were blown out.
Many former pupils signed up for service in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. In fact 49 gave their lives and are commemorated in the book. The school was represented in every branch of service in World War 2.
The star pupil of the school in 1934-35 was also a casualty of the war. Corporal Thomas B. Andrews of the Royal Army Service Corps died on 10/5/1940;

There are four women/girls remembered. Three were civilians killed in the Dudley Drive bombing but the fourth was a fourth was Private Ellen Houston of the Auxiliary Territorial Service. She died 8/5/1946.


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